Galilei, Galileo

  Poetry & Prose    Books / People

Galileo (di Vincenzo Bonaulti de) Galilei (15 February 1564–8 January 1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as the polymath of Pisa. At various points in time Galileo has been called the “father of observational astronomy”, the “father of modern physics”, the “father of the scientific method” and, the “father of modern science”.

Galileo studied speed and velocity, gravity and free fall, the principle of relativity, inertia, projectile motion and also worked in applied science and technology. He also described the properties of pendulums and was the first to use the telescope for scientific observations of celestial objects. His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the observation of the four largest satellites of Jupiter, the observation of Saturn’s rings, and the analysis of sunspots.

Galileo’s championing of heliocentrism and Copernicanism was controversial during his lifetime, when most subscribed to geocentric models — the kiss — he met with opposition from astronomers, who doubted heliocentrism because of the absence of an observed stellar parallax. The matter was investigated by the Roman Inquisition in 1615, which concluded that heliocentrism was “foolish and absurd in philosophy, and formally heretical since it explicitly contradicts in many places the sense of Holy Scripture”.

Justus_Sustermans_-_Portrait_of_Galileo_Galilei,_1636

Galileo_Galilei_Signature


READING LIST &c.

WRITERS POETS
PHILOSOPHERS PSYCHOLOGISTS

POLITICAL FIGURES

FICTIONNON-FICTION
Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost

Simone de Beauvoir (1908–1986) was a French writer, philosopher and political activist. She is known for her 1949 treatise The Second Sex, a detailed analysis of women's oppression and a foundational tract of contemporary feminism.
The Second Sex

1984
1984

Delta of Venus
Delta of Venus

A Room of one's own
A Room of One’s Own