Amoretti LXXV

“One Day I Wrote Her Name”

One day I wrote her name upon the strand,
But came the waves and washed it away:
Again I wrote it with a second hand,
But came the tide, and made my pains his prey.

“Vain man,” said she, “that dost in vain assay,
A mortal thing so to immortalize;
For I myself shall like to this decay,
And eke my name be wiped out likewise.”

“Not so,” (quod I) “let baser things devise
To die in dust, but you shall live by fame:
My verse your vertues rare shall eternize,
And in the heavens write your glorious name:

Where whenas death shall all the world subdue,
Our love shall live, and later life renew.”

— Edmund Spenser


p.s.
Roman Numerals
Roman numerals are the numbers that were used in ancient Rome, which employed combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet:
I — 1
V — 5
X — 10
L — 50
C — 100
D — 500
M — 1,000

Numbers are represented by putting the symbols into various combinations in different orders. The symbols are then added together, for example:
— I + I + I, written as III, is 3.
— To write 11 we add X (10) and I (1) and write XI.
— For 22 we add X and X and I and I, so XXII.

Roman numerals are usually written in order, from largest to smallest and from left to right, but more than three identical symbols never appear in a row. Instead, a system of subtraction is used. When a smaller number appears in front of a larger one, that needs to be subtracted, so:
IV is 4 (5 – 1)
IX is 9 (10 – 1)
The subtraction system is used in six cases:
— I is placed before V and X so, IV is 4 and IX is 9.
— X is placed before L (50) and C (100) so, XL is 40 and XC is 90.
— C is placed before D (500) and M (1000) so, CD is 400 and CM is 900.

So, “LXXV” equates to: 75.

Sonnet 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st;

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

— William Shakespeare

See too: ‘sOnly a sOnnet

‘Message in a bottle’

Save. Our. Soul.

Bottles out at sea
This one goes out…

A message in a bottle is a form of communication in which a message is sealed in a container (typically a bottle) and thrown into the sea.

Messages in bottles have been used to send (1) distress messages and/or to carry letters or reports from those believing themselves to be doomed (2), in scientific studies of ocean currents, as memorial tributes and (3), to send deceased loved ones’ ashes on a final journey.

Love letters have also been sent as messages in bottles. Indeed, the lore surrounding messages in bottles has often been of a romantic or poetic nature.

Nowadays, the phrase, message in a bottle, has expanded to include metaphorical uses (uses beyond its traditional and literal meaning). Say for example, sending an estranged lover an email begging for a reprieve whilst knowing a reply, let alone a reprieve is rather unlikely.

message in a bottle

Pioneer 10 plaque
…to the one I love.

✍🏻 How I Yearn 4 U

[ . & your perfect smile . ]

    I burn beyond belief
    I crave u desperately
    You’re my opium & oxygen
    •
    u say:
    (( the last fight killed me ))
    (( I’m broken ))
    (( I’m now a different person ))
    •
    But, i need u 2 no:
    2 me u r u and, u R u
    U 2 me r utterly irreplaceable
    I live only 2 be with u
    U R my One&Only
    ~ My Heat
    ~~ My Heart
    ~~~ My Happiness
    ~~~~ My Heaven-sent Heroine
    •
    Your honey IS MY heroin.

4ever
From here to infinity

✍🏻 The Pain

is so truly limitless

  I‘d read about love on many an occasion
  Love, they said, could kill without any exertion
  Until last month this was abstract exposition

  Inconsolable now; I’m “dead on the inside”
  Love so pristine, which I’ve now rendered denied
  Unless I can make mends, pure heartache will preside

  Irreplaceable: You are a unique snowflake
  Love so pure flowed between us; let’s not forsake
  U R the only one, of this, make no mistake.


Gaius Catullus

(Roman | 84–54 BC)

I hate and I love
Why do I, you ask?
I don’t know, but it’s happening
and it hurts

Gaius Catullus was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes

Let us live and love, nor give a damn what sour old men say.
The sun that sets may rise again, but when our light has sunk into the earth it is gone forever.

W.O.L.O., dearest J

Lesbia, I am mad:
my brain is entirely warped

by this project of adoring
and having you

and now it flies into fits
of hatred at the mere thought of your

doing well, and at the same time
it can’t help but seek what

is unimaginable–
your affection. This it will go on

hunting for, even if it
means my total and utter annihilation.

Kisses r sumptuous & life sustaining.

Lesbia, you ask how many kisses of yours
would be enough and more to satisfy me.
As many as the grains of Libyan sand
that lie between hot Jupiter’s oracle,
at Ammon, in resin-producing Cyrene,
and old Battiades sacred tomb:
or as many as the stars, when night is still,
gazing down on secret human desires:
as many of your kisses kissed
are enough, and more, for mad Catullus,
as can’t be counted by spies
nor an evil tongue bewitch us.