‘Poetic license’

= bending the rules to make one’s art more captivating.

Poetic Licence...?
Curse those giants’ shoulders! ****

Poetic license means the ‘license’ or ‘liberty’ taken by a poet, prose writer, or other artist in deviating from facts and genre conventions etc. so as to be able to produce more interesting and/or effective artwork.

For instance, we know that we should follow poetic rhyming conventions and syllable and stanza counts but sometimes, the message is more important than the mode so, we take the liberty of scrapping some of the rules every once in a while (see: “Sun, Sand &”).


p.s.
Why not see this post too: ‘Poetic justice’

**** Standing on the shoulders of giants.  This metaphor/phrase/idiom: ‘of dwarfs standing on the shoulders of giants’ (Latin: nanos gigantum humeris insidentes) means, discovering truth by building on previous discoveries. This idea/notion has been traced to the 12th c. and is attributed to Bernard of Chartres. Famously, in 1675, Isaac Newton wrote the following, “if I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.”

Me, upon you.
I was carried by you, I was nestled upon your shoulders my dearest one.

‘Poetic justice’

has now been served

Poetic justice is a literary device in which ultimately virtue is rewarded and viciousness is punished. In current usage it is often accompanied by an ironic twist of fate related to the individual in question’s own actions and behaviour.

‘Getting a taste of one’s own medicine’

Typically medicine don’t taste nice. Thus, if you make people feel unappreciated, insecure, jealous and anxious, you’ve little right to complain if they turn around and do the same back to you.

‘What goes around, comes around’

Similarly, what goes around comes around, means that if you treat people badly, you can’t be too surprised if one day you find yourself being treated in that same kind of way.


Poetic justice
noun
The fact of experiencing a fitting or deserved retribution for one’s actions.

Retribution
noun
The punishment inflicted on someone as vengeance for their wrong doing or criminal actions.

Vengeance
noun
The punishment inflicted or retribution exacted for causing an injury or having done something wrong.

Virtue
noun
A form of behaviour showing high moral standards.

Vicious
adjective
To be deliberately cruel and/or violent.

‘By hook or by crook’

any means necessary

‘By hook or by crook’ is an English phrase meaning “by any means necessary”, suggesting that any means possible should be taken to accomplish a goal. The phrase is old and the first currently known written instance of it is the Middle English Controversial Tracts of John Wycliffe.

Do what you have to do
Do what you have to do

One way, or another, I’m gunna gunna get ya


John Wycliffe (c. 1323–1384) was an English scholastic philosopher, theologian, reformer and a professor at the University of Oxford. He became an influential dissident within the Roman Catholic priesthood during the 14th c. and is considered an important predecessor to Protestantism.

Hook / Crook
^ Look at how they spell John.

‘The “F” word’

Out of all the English words that begin with the letter F, this one’s the only one referred to as ‘The F word.’ It’s one of the most commonly used words in the English language and, it can be used in many many ways.

'Fuck'
This is a language lesson…

It can be used as a transitive verb for instance, “John fucked Julie,” as an intransitive verb, “Julie fucks.”

It’s meaning is not always sexual. It can be used as an adjective such as, “Julie’s doing all the fucking work.”

As part of an adverb, “John talks too fucking much.” As an adverb enhancing an adjective, “Jameela is fucking beautiful.” As the object of an adverb, “Shirley is fucking beautifully.”

As a noun, “I don’t give a fuck.”

As part of a word, “Abso-fucking-lutly.”

And, as almost every work in a sentence:

Fuck the fucking fuckers.

There are very few words with the versatility of ‘fuck’:

Aggression — “Don’t fuck with me mate.”

Anger — “You’re doing my fucking head in.”

Difficulty — “I don’t fucking understand this situation at all.”

Dismay — “Aww, fuck it,”

Dismissal — “Why don’t you go fuck yourself?”

Dissatisfaction — “I don’t like what the fuck is going on here.”

Fraud — “I got fucked at the used car lot.”

Incompetence — “He’s a fucking idiot.”

Inquiry — “Who the fuck was that!”

Trouble — “We’ve been caught, we are truly fucked now.”

… so don’t be offended!!

‘Message in a bottle’

Save. Our. Soul.

Bottles out at sea
This one goes out…

A message in a bottle is a form of communication in which a message is sealed in a container (typically a bottle) and thrown into the sea.

Messages in bottles have been used to send (1) distress messages and/or to carry letters or reports from those believing themselves to be doomed (2), in scientific studies of ocean currents, as memorial tributes and (3), to send deceased loved ones’ ashes on a final journey.

Love letters have also been sent as messages in bottles. Indeed, the lore surrounding messages in bottles has often been of a romantic or poetic nature.

Nowadays, the phrase, message in a bottle, has expanded to include metaphorical uses (uses beyond its traditional and literal meaning). Say for example, sending an estranged lover an email begging for a reprieve whilst knowing a reply, let alone a reprieve is rather unlikely.

message in a bottle

Pioneer 10 plaque
…to the one I love.

‘Clutching at straws’

= to be willing to try anything to improve a difficult situation, even if there’s little chance of success.

The etymology of the phrase, clutching at straws, is thought to have originated in the work of Thomas More called, Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation (1534).


See More’s Utopia on this blog.


The idiom clutching at straws is therefore meant to refer to a drowning person grasping for anything, even a straw, to save their life (straw, like wooden logs, floats on water but, whereas a log wouldn’t sink if a person were to hold on to it for dear life*, straw probably would sink). Nowadays, the phrase has come to mean something like this:

to act or make a decision, usually in desperation, without there being much hope of success.

desperate
Desperate, I am.

p.s.
* British English 🇬🇧 is full of references to the sea because, being an island, have a deep relationship with the seas and, if you were at sea and had fallen overboard (off of a boat or a ship) you’d hope not to end up in, Davy Jones’ Locker
.

Davy Jones’ Locker is an idiom for the bottom of the sea: the state of death among drowned sailors and shipwrecks. The phrase then is used as a euphemism for drowning (at sea) 🏴‍☠️.

British Humour

when we say English humour, we think of: Michael McIntyre

JS87386921
He makes witty remarks of daily life.

Main Categories of Humour are:

1. Irony we highlight when something is different.
Example:
Our local fir station burnt down last night.

Phrase:
– Oh the irony!
– Oh how ironic!


2. Sarcasm uses irony to mock or ridicule.
Example:
When something bad happens, and you respond is:
That’s just what I needed today!

Phrase:
– I’m being sarcastic.
– that was sarcasm.


3. Dead Pan/ Dry Humour when something amusing or funny is said with a straight face and serious tone.

* Best jokes delivered direly.


4. Wit making quick and intelligent remarks and comments. preferably with a straight face.

* To be called as witty in UK is the mother of all compliments.


5. Self-deprecation making fun of oneself.
Example:
– BRITAIN IS A GREAT PLACE TO VISIT if you don’t mind poor weather and questionable food.
– I’m so bad at cooking, I could burn water!

* we don’t like to show off in the UK, instead we like fun of ourselves.


6. Innuendo/ Double Entendres when we intentionally say things that could be interpreted as taboo or sexual in meaning.
Example:
– I would like to see his meat between two vegetables.
– There is a plate of sausages over there, would like to give her one.

* This are huge part of British culture/ English Humour.


7. Banter playful teasing that can be quiet harsh.

*Banter could be teasing, but Witty Banter could be very intelligent comment.


8. Puns/ Play on Words making funny comments by bending and using the language.

* Its very common to Puns on shops names

Example:
– Bread Pitt
– Thai me up (authentic thai cuisine)
– Junk & Disorderly (Furniture Dealer)
– Frying Nemo (Fish & Chips)
– Fuckoffee (Café)
– Hand Job (Nails & Spa)
– Pussies & Bitches (Petshop & Grooming Salon)
– Indian Bones (Pet Wash)