British Humour

when we say English humour, we think of: Michael McIntyre

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He makes witty remarks of daily life.

Main Categories of Humour are:

1. Irony we highlight when something is different.
Example:
Our local fir station burnt down last night.

Phrase:
– Oh the irony!
– Oh how ironic!


2. Sarcasm uses irony to mock or ridicule.
Example:
When something bad happens, and you respond is:
That’s just what I needed today!

Phrase:
– I’m being sarcastic.
– that was sarcasm.


3. Dead Pan/ Dry Humour when something amusing or funny is said with a straight face and serious tone.

* Best jokes delivered direly.


4. Wit making quick and intelligent remarks and comments. preferably with a straight face.

* To be called as witty in UK is the mother of all compliments.


5. Self-deprecation making fun of oneself.
Example:
– BRITAIN IS A GREAT PLACE TO VISIT if you don’t mind poor weather and questionable food.
– I’m so bad at cooking, I could burn water!

* we don’t like to show off in the UK, instead we like fun of ourselves.


6. Innuendo/ Double Entendres when we intentionally say things that could be interpreted as taboo or sexual in meaning.
Example:
– I would like to see his meat between two vegetables.
– There is a plate of sausages over there, would like to give her one.

* This are huge part of British culture/ English Humour.


7. Banter playful teasing that can be quiet harsh.

*Banter could be teasing, but Witty Banter could be very intelligent comment.


8. Puns/ Play on Words making funny comments by bending and using the language.

* Its very common to Puns on shops names

Example:
– Bread Pitt
– Thai me up (authentic thai cuisine)
– Junk & Disorderly (Furniture Dealer)
– Frying Nemo (Fish & Chips)
– Fuckoffee (Café)
– Hand Job (Nails & Spa)
– Pussies & Bitches (Petshop & Grooming Salon)
– Indian Bones (Pet Wash)

Skulduggery

[noun]

In a sentence: “In the era of to Brexit or not, British politics is all skulduggery!”

Meaning: underhand, unscrupulous, or dishonest activities.

skulduggery //

Synonyms: double-dealing, jiggery-pokery, monkey business, shenanigans.

double dealing //

jiggery-pokery //

monkey business //

shenanigans //

Etymology etc.: interestingly the term has no direct connection to either skulls or digging. The word appears to originate in Britain during the 18th c. where sculduddery meant ‘indecency’ or ‘breach of chastity,’ defined at the time in legal terms as: “fornication or adultery.” Today the word means ‘underhanded dealings,’ ‘trickery’ or ‘clandestine machinations’ and is most often associated with cloak-and-dagger intelligence agencies such as the UK’s MI6*, it was famously used by The Times in 1980, “Watergate was such a sensational piece of skulduggery.”**


* MI6
In the UK, MI5 deals with security threats within Great Britain, and MI6 combat overseas threats to Britain and/or British overseas interests (MI = Military Intelligence). For the USA, there’s the FBI for security threats within America and the CIA for threats to American and/or American overseas interests (FBI = Federal Bureau of Investigation; CIA = Central Intelligence Agency).

** Watergate
The Watergate scandal was a major American political scandal in the 1970s. It resulted from a robbery at the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters (the “Watergate” office complex in Washington) and Republican President Richard Nixon’s subsequent attempt to cover up his administration’s involvement in the robbery.

“What’s on the box?”

bugger all (i.e., nothing much)

This question – what’s on the box? – used to be heard frequently in the homes of Britain. This was because televisions used to be box-shaped and because there was no internet so watching TV together was the national pastime.

This phrase is becoming obsolete, not least because TVs are now flat. But more significantly because nowadays, people rarely watch broadcast TV. They tend instead to watch catch-up TV (e.g., via BBC’s iPlayer) or streaming services (such as Netflix) more often than not, alone.

As I say,

“If you wanna pacify your kids, turn on the box and they’ll shut their gobs.”

Groucho Marx once said,

“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.”

Orwell’s 1984

Control is freedom; slavery is liberation.

An apocalyptical codex of our worst fears.

Nineteen Eighty-Four has not just sold tens of millions of copies – it has infiltrated the consciousness of countless people who have never read it.

The phrases and concepts that Orwell minted (coined) have become essential fixtures of political language. Popular ones include: newspeak, Big Brother, the thought police, doublethink, memory hole, 2+2=5 and the ministry of truth.

The word Orwellian has turned the author’s own name into a capacious synonym for everything he hated and feared.

 

Poetic Modus Operandi

Some modes or types of poetic style… the full list is indefinite.

Argumentative mode
Speaker expresses an opinion or disagrees with another one


Confessional mode
Speaker expresses private or secret thoughts or emotions


Descriptive mode
Speaker details a scene, usually in the present tense


Dialogic mode
Two or more voices take turns in speaking


Didactic mode
Speaker informs or advises the addressee or addressees


Discursive mode
Speaker discusses a topic in the manner of an essay


Dramatic mode
Speaker interacts with others in a well-defined situation


Elegiac mode
Speaker regrets the loss of something or someone


Eulogic mode
Speaker praises something or someone


Expository mode
Speaker illustrates or explains something


Lyric mode
Speaker expresses thoughts or emotions


Narrative mode
Speaker tells a story, usually in the past tense


Persuasive mode
Speaker tries to convince the addressee or addressees


Polemic mode
Speaker criticises something or someone explicitly


Satiric mode
Speaker criticises something or someone implicitly