Psychological Effects Explain Our Brains

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1. The Pratfall Effect – your likability will increase if you aren’t perfect.

2. The Pygmalion Effect – greater expectations drive greater performance.

3. The Paradox of Choice – the more choice we have, the less likely we are to be content with our decision.

4. The Bystander Effect – the more people who see someone in need, the less likely that person is to receive help.

5. The Spotlight Effect – your mistakes are not noticed as much as you think.

6. The Focusing Effect – people place too much important on one aspect of an event and fail to recognise other factors.

British Humour

when we say English humour, we think of: Michael McIntyre

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He makes witty remarks of daily life.

Main Categories of Humour are:

1. Irony we highlight when something is different.
Example:
Our local fir station burnt down last night.

Phrase:
– Oh the irony!
– Oh how ironic!


2. Sarcasm uses irony to mock or ridicule.
Example:
When something bad happens, and you respond is:
That’s just what I needed today!

Phrase:
– I’m being sarcastic.
– that was sarcasm.


3. Dead Pan/ Dry Humour when something amusing or funny is said with a straight face and serious tone.

* Best jokes delivered direly.


4. Wit making quick and intelligent remarks and comments. preferably with a straight face.

* To be called as witty in UK is the mother of all compliments.


5. Self-deprecation making fun of oneself.
Example:
– BRITAIN IS A GREAT PLACE TO VISIT if you don’t mind poor weather and questionable food.
– I’m so bad at cooking, I could burn water!

* we don’t like to show off in the UK, instead we like fun of ourselves.


6. Innuendo/ Double Entendres when we intentionally say things that could be interpreted as taboo or sexual in meaning.
Example:
– I would like to see his meat between two vegetables.
– There is a plate of sausages over there, would like to give her one.

* This are huge part of British culture/ English Humour.


7. Banter playful teasing that can be quiet harsh.

*Banter could be teasing, but Witty Banter could be very intelligent comment.


8. Puns/ Play on Words making funny comments by bending and using the language.

* Its very common to Puns on shops names

Example:
– Bread Pitt
– Thai me up (authentic thai cuisine)
– Junk & Disorderly (Furniture Dealer)
– Frying Nemo (Fish & Chips)
– Fuckoffee (Café)
– Hand Job (Nails & Spa)
– Pussies & Bitches (Petshop & Grooming Salon)
– Indian Bones (Pet Wash)

From America with Love

we only live once, right?

i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart)i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go, my dear; and whatever is done
by only me is your doing, my darling)
i fear

no fate(for you are my fate, my sweet)i want
no world(for beautiful you are my world, my true)
and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant
and whatever a sun will always sing is you

here is the deepest secret nobody knows
(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud
and the sky of the sky of a tree called life; which grows
higher than soul can hope or mind can hide)
and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart

i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart)

Penned by: Edward Estlin “E. E.” Cummings (or as he liked to write it: e e cummings), an American poet and essayist. He dabbled in the erotic genre (this/I like^).

Although Cummings could and did write traditionally styled verse including sonnets, much of his work did not conform to established poetic styles and structures. Cummings experimented radically with form, punctuation, spelling and syntax; and invented compound words to create a highly individualistic style of expression (this too I;m liking a lot).

Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye”

(1919–2010)

Among other things, you’ll find that you’re not the first person who was ever confused, frightened and sickened by human behaviour…

…you’ll learn from those, if you want to; it isn’t education, it is history and it is poetry.

Noted for its themes of angst and alienation and its critique on superficiality in society, Catcher in the Rye is often listed as one of the best novels of the twentieth century. The work is regarded as, “the defining work on what it is like to be a teenager;” although it is a bit dated now. It is usually placed alongside The Great Gatsby as being a classic of the post WWII era.

J. D. Salinger is a classic writer in the sense that he took his writing very seriously. He was was known to have locked himself up for hours and hours every single day. He’d write, revise, edit, rewrite again and again (and again). Arguably, Salinger wrote to collect his thoughts and ideas for his own peace of mind and mental health (i.e., not to get rich).

Don’t ever tell anybody anything.

To experience pure pleasure

must we suffer deep pain?

What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.

I’ve read that evidence suggests pain may actually enhance the pleasure and happiness we get from life. The argument goes like this: without pain life becomes boring and dull. If we are given all the chocolate in the world, we would soon forget what it was that made our desire for chocolate so desirable in the first place.

By definition a permanent state of pleasure would not be pleasurable. We need something other than pleasure, for pleasure to compare to. But must it be pain? Could it not just be normality?

Must we take the rough to get the smooth…

On being Stoic

Stoicism 101

“The endurance of hardship without complaint.”

1.

Stoicism does not focus on complicated theories, it focuses on how one can overcome one’s own destructive emotions and act upon what one can actually act upon.

2.

Three individuals helped create and shape stoicism, they were: Marcus Aurelius, an emperor of the Roman Empire (he is said to have sat down each day to write himself notes about restraint, compassion and humility. Epictetus the Slave, who endured the horrors of being a slave but later went on to set up a school where he taught many of Rome’s VIPs and intellectuals. And another Roman great called Seneca the Serene.

3.

Stoicism’s key points: (a) it sets out to remind us of how unpredictable the world can be (b), how brief our moment of life is (c), how to be steadfast, and strong, and in control of yourself and (d), that the source of our dissatisfaction lies in our impulsive dependency on our reflexive senses rather than logic.

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