Anthology of English Literature

Poetry & Prose

This anthology — a representative collection of text that comprise the English literature canon — is based upon the one compiled by the venerable Norton publishing house. This page is designed to work in tandem with this site’s Chronology of English literature (which provides a large number of readings rendered as audio files). Together, this anthology and that chronology are designed to accompany the Literary Analysis section of this site (which provides detailed guidance on how to analyse and critique poetry and prose and a comprehensive glossary of all associated terminology etc.).

Seven Eras of English

01. — The Middle Ages
¶ Medieval Estates and Orders: Making and Breaking Rules
¶ King Arthur: Romancing Politics
¶ The First Crusade: Sanctifying War
¶ The Linguistic and Literary Contexts of Beowulf
 
02. — The 16th century
¶ The Magician, the Heretic, and the Playwright
¶ Renaissance Exploration, Travel, and the World Outside Europe
¶ Dissent, Doubt, and Spiritual Violence in the Reformation
¶ Island Nations
 
03. — The Early 17th century
¶ Gender, Family, Household: 17th c. Norms and Controversies
¶ Paradise Lost in Context
¶ Civil Wars of Ideas
¶ Emigrants and Settlers
 
04. — The Restoration and the 18th century
¶ A Day in Eighteenth-Century London
¶ Slavery and the Slave Trade in Britain
¶ The Plurality of Worlds
¶ Travel, Trade, and the Expansion of Empire
 
05. — The Romantic Period
¶ Tintern Abbey, Tourism, and Romantic Landscape
¶ The Gothic
¶ The French Revolution: Apocalyptic Expectations
¶ Romantic Orientalism
 
06. — The Victorian Age
¶ Industrialism: Progress or Decline?
¶ The Woman Question
¶ The Painterly Image in Poetry
¶ Victorian Imperialism
 
07. — The 20th century and After
¶ Representing the Great War
¶ Modernist Experiment
¶ Imagining Ireland

Relevant Reads


📙 Oxford University’s Chronology of English Literature
This chronology has two related columns of information, allowing you to review key works of English literature in relation to their time. One lists the significant literary works published in a given year. The other provides a parallel range of information on ruling monarchs; historical events and, the birth and death dates of key authors, thinkers and painters &c.
 
📙 The Persistence of English
This is an informative 2013 essay by Geoffrey Nunberg of Stanford University. It considers how the English language is currently at the moment of its greatest triumph — in the sense of it having around 1.5 billion speakers (approximately a quarter of the world’s population).
 
📙 The Adventure of English
English is understood by around two thousand million people across the world. In this 2006 book, Melvyn Bragg explores the story of the English language — from its beginnings as a minor Germanic dialect to its position today as a truly established global language.
 
📙 English as a Global Language (2nd ed.)
A factual account of the rise of English as a global language and the whys and wherefores of the history are explored in the 2003 second edition book by David Crystal.
 
📙 The Poetry Handbook (2nd ed.)
This is the introduction chapter of J. Lenard’s 2006 book as an editable PDF file. As is written, “this book is for anyone who wants to read poetry with a better understanding of its craft and technique.” It also gives guidance on how to analysing poetry.

— § § § —

01. — The Middle Ages

Editable PDF: MANKIND
Mankind is an English medieval morality play, written c. 1470. The play is a moral allegory about Mankind, a representative of the human race, and follows his fall into sin and his repentance. Its author is unknown; the manuscript is signed by a monk named Hyngham, believed to have transcribed the play. Mankind is unique among moralities for its surprising juxtaposition of serious theological matters and colloquial (sometimes obscene) dialogue.

Editable PDF: THE ANGLO-SAXON CHRONICLE
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a historical record in English, which takes the form of annals—that is, an annual summary of important events.

Editable PDF: THE BATTLE OF MALDON
The Battle of Maldon celebrates an event of the year 991, when a large party of Scandinavian raiders met the English defense forces on the estuary of the Blackwater River (the Pant of the poem), near Maldon in Essex.

Editable PDF: THE BROME PLAY OF ABRAHAM AND ISAAC
The story of Abraham and Isaac as told in Genesis xxii is a very spare account of an incident that appealed greatly to the medieval imagination, which was always stimulated by a situation in which an ideal is upheld at the expense of all normal human values. This all-or-nothing attitude may also be seen in Chaucer’s Franklin’s Tale, where Arveragus delivers his wife to an adulterer in order that she should not be guilty of breaking her word, one’s pledged word being, according to him, the most demanding of human contracts. In the story of Abraham and Isaac, it is obedience to God’s command that a father sacrifice his son that must be carried out.

Editable PDF: WILLIAM CAXTON / Preface to Morte Darthur
William Caxton (c. 1422 – c. 1491) was an English merchant, diplomat, and writer. He is thought to be the first person to introduce a printing press into England, in 1476, and as a printer was the first English retailer of printed books.

GEOFFREY CHAUCER
The Canterbury Tales
The Merchant’s Tale
The Franklin’s Tale
The Tale of Sir Thopas
The Parson’s Tale
The Parliament of Fowls
To Rosamond

Lludd and Lleuelys
The Welsh tale of Lludd and Lleuelys is preserved in a collection of stories contained in two manuscripts, the English titles of which are the White Book of Rhydderch (written c.1300–1325) and the Red Book of Hergest (c.1375–1425). The stories are thought to be much older, some dating back to the latter part of the eleventh century.

MEDIEVAL ATTITUDES TOWARD LIFE ON EARTH
The words with which the Lord God cursed Adam and Eve after their transgression formed, for many articulate men in the Middle Ages, an accurate image of human life: something which was wretched because the Creator had made it so. Such thinkers believed that man had to acknowledge the wretchedness of his life and feel contempt for the world in which he lived in order to attain spiritual salvation.
— Contempt for the World
— Boethius: The Consolation of Philosophy
— Triumph Over the World

The Last Journey
A Change in Perspective

— “Beauty That Must Die”

[Ubi Sunt Qui ante Nos Fuerunt]
François Villon: The Ballad of Dead Ladies<

The Goddess Fortune

  • Boethius: The Consolation of Philosophy
    • Fortune Defends Herself
  • Dante: Fortune an Agent of God’s Will
  • “Life Is Sweet”
    • A Vision of Nature in Piers Plowman
    • Aucassin and Nicolette
  • Aucassin Renounces Paradise
  • From The Land of Cockaigne
  • — MIDDLE ENGLISH LYRICS

    • In Praise of Brunettes
    • The Appreciative Drinker
    • A Charm Against the Night Goblin
    • The Blacksmiths
    • Earth Took of Earth
    • Spring Has Come with Love
    • The Henpecked Husband
    • A Bitter Lullaby

    — AN OLD ENGLISH RIDDLE

    • The Bow

    — SIR ORFEO
    — PIERS PLOWMAN

    • Passus 5: The Confession of Envy
    • Passus 5: The Confession of Gluttony

    — POPULAR BALLADS
    Ballads are anonymous narrative songs that have been preserved by oral transmission. The origins of the popular (or folk) ballad are much disputed. Though the English ballads were probably composed during the five-hundred-year period from 1200 to 1700, few of them were printed before the eighteenth century and some not until the nineteenth
    — Edward
    — Hind Horn
    — Judas
    — Robin Hood and the Three Squires

    The Middle Ages, AUDIO FILES

    “Prologue” from Beowulf (lines 1-98), anonymous, date unknown. — Read by Seamus Heaney.
     


    “The Fight with Grendel” from Beowulf (lines 710-823), anonymous, date unknown. — Read by Seamus Heaney.
     


    “The Last Survivor’s Speech” from Beowulf (lines 2241b-70a), anonymous, date unknown. — Read by Seamus Heaney.
     


    Caedmon’s Hymn, anonymous, date unknown. — Read by J. B. Bessinger.
     


    “Birhtwold’s Speech” from The Battle of Maldon, anonymous, date unknown. — Read by Robert Fulk.
     


    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (lines 1-19), anonymous, date unknown. — Read by Marie Borroff.
     


    “The General Prologue” (lines 547-68) from The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, date unknown. — Read by Alfred David.
     


    “The Miller’s Prologue “from The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, date unknown. — Read by V. A. Kolve.
     


    “The Miller’s Tale” (lines 163-98) from The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, date unknown. — Read by Alfred David.
     


    “The Man of Law’s Epilogue” from The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, date unknown. — Read by V. A. Kolve.
     


    “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue” (lines 1-29) from The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, date unknown. — Read by Marie Borroff.
     


    “The Pardoner’s Tale” (lines 428-61) from The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer. — Read by Alfred David.
     


    “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale” (lines 337-66) from The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, date unknown. — Read by Alfred David.
     

    Chronology of The Middle Ages


    Chronology of The Middle Ages
    To read a detailed chronology and a summary of the literature and contexts of this era, visit “The Middle Ages” section of this site’s Chronology of English Literature page.

     

    — § § § —

    02. — The 16th century

    ANONYMOUS LYRICS

    • Back and Side Go Bare, Go Bare
    • In Praise of a Contented Mind
    • Though Amaryllis Dance in Green
    • Constant Penelope Sends to Thee
    • The Queen’s Champion Retires
    • The Shepherd’s Consort
    • Come Away, Come, Sweet Love!
    • Thule, the Period of Cosmography
    • Madrigal (“My love in her attire doth show her wit”)
    • Weep You No More, Sad Fountains
    • The Silver Swan
    • An Exhortation Concerning Good Order and Obedience to Rulers and Magistrates
      • The Book of Homilies

    — ROGER ASCHAM

    • Comeliness

    — THOMAS CAMPION

    • When Thou Must Home to Shades of Underground
    • What If a Day
    • Never Love Unless You Can
    • Rose-cheeked Laura
    • Think’st Thou to Seduce Me Then

    — SAMUEL DANIEL

    • From Delia
    • From Musophilus [Imperial Eloquence]

    — SIR JOHN DAVIES

    • From Orchestra

    — THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROSE STYLE

    • Sir John Cheke
      • [Our Own Tongue Clean and Pure]
    • The Bible
      • Translations of the Twenty-third Psalm
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      • From Arcadia
    • Philip Stubbes
      • From The Anatomy of Abuses
    • William Bullein
      • From A Dialogue Against the Pestilence [Travelers’ Tales]

    — MICHAEL DRAYTON

    • Idea

    — SIR EDWARD DYER

    • My Mind to Me a Kingdom Is

    — RICHARD EDWARDS

    • Amantium Irae Amoris Redintegratio Est

    — JOHN FOXE

    • From Acts and Monuments

    — HUGH LATIMER

    • Sermon of the Plowers

    — GEORGE GASCOIGNE

    — FULKE GREVILLE, LORD BROOKE

    • From Mustapha [Chorus Sacerdotum]

    — ARTHUR GOLDING

    • from Ovid’s Metamorphoses
      • The Four Ages

    — HAKLUYT’S VOYAGES

    • From A Brief and True Report
    • An Extract of Master Ralph Lane’s Letter

    — MARY (SIDNEY) HERBERT, COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE

    • To the Angel Spirit of Sir Philip Sidney
    • Psalm 58 Si Vere Utique

    — SIR THOMAS HOBY

    • The Courtier

    — RICHARD HOOKER

    • Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity
      • From The Preface [On Moderation in Controversy]
      • From Book 1, Chapter 8 [On the Scope of the Several Laws]
      • From Book 1, Chapter 10 [The Foundations of Society]
      • From Book 1, Chapter 12 [The Need for Revealed Law]
      • From Book 1, Chapter 16 [Conclusion]

    — HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF SURREY

    • The Fourth Book of Virgil
      • [The Hunt]
    • The Second Book of Virgil
      • [Hector Warns Aeneas to Flee Troy]
    • Set Whereas the Sun Doth Parch the Green
    • Give Place, Ye Lovers, Here Before

    — JOHN LYLY

    • Cupid and My Campaspe

    — “MARTIN MARPRELATE”

    • Hay Any Work for Cooper

    — THOMAS NASHE

     

    • Spring, the Sweet Spring
    • Pierce Penniless, His Supplication to the Devil
      • An Invective Against Enemies of Poetry
      • [The Defense of Plays]
    • From The Unfortunate Traveler, or The Life of Jack Wilton
      • [Roman Summer]

    — GEORGE PEELE

    • Fair and Fair

    — SIR WALTER RALEGH

    • A Report of the Truth of the Fight About the Isles of Azores This Last Summer Betwixt the Revenge, One of Her Majesty’s Ships, and an Armada of the King of Spain
    • Walsinghame

    — WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

    • SONGS FROM THE PLAYS
      • When Daisies Pied
    • Spring
    • Winter
    • The Woosel Cock So Black of Hue
    • Tell Me Where Is Fancy Bred
    • Sigh No More, Ladies
    • Under the Greenwood Tree
    • Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind
    • It Was a Lover and His Lass
    • Oh Mistress Mine
    • Take, Oh, Take Those Lips Away
    • Hark, Hark! the Lark
    • Fear No More the Heat o’ the Sun
    • When Daffodils Begin to Peer
    • Full Fathom Five
    • Where the Bee Sucks, There Suck I
    • SONNETS
    • 56 (“Sweet love, renew thy force; be it not said”)
    • 104 (“To me, fair friend, you never can be old”)
    • 118 (“Like as, to make our appetites more keen”)
    • 121 (“‘Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed”)
    • 124 (“If my dear love were but the child of state”)
    • 128 (“How oft when thou, my music, music play’st”)
    • The Phoenix and the Turtle
    • King Henry the Fourth, Part I

    — SIR PHILIP SIDNEY

      • Astrophil and Stella
        • 7 (“When Nature made her chief work, Stella’s eyes”)
        • 39 (“Come Sleep! O sleep the certain knot of peace”)
        • 61 (“Off with true sights, oft with uncallèd tears”)

    — JOHN SKELTON

    • Upon a Dead Man’s Head
    • To Mistress Margaret Hussey
    • Colin Clout
      • [The Spirituality vs. the Temporality]

    — EDMUND SPENSER

    • Book II. The Cave of Mammon
    • Book III. Contayning the Legend of Britomartis, or of Chastitie
    • Book VII. Mutabilitie Cantos
      • Canto VI
      • Canto VII
      • The VIII Canto, unperfite
    • An Hymne in Honour of Beautie

    — CHIDIOCK TICHBORNE

    • Tichborne’s Elegy

    — ISABELLA WHITNEY

    • Will and Testament

    — SIR THOMAS WYATT (the Elder)

    • Like to the Unmeasurable Mountains
    • Lux, My Fair Falcon
    • Tangled I Was in Love’s Snare
    • In Spain
    • And wilt thou leave me thus?

    — § § § —

    03. — The Early 17th century

    — ANONYMOUS

    — JOHN AUBREY

    • The Life of Thomas Hobbes

    — SIR ROBERT AYTOUN

    • To an Inconstant One

    — FRANCIS BEAUMONT AND JOHN FLETCHER

    • Songs from The Faithful Shepherdess
    • Songs from Valentinian
    • Songs from The Masque of the Inner Temple
      and Gray’s Inn

    — WILLIAM BROWNE

    • On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke

    — ROBERT BURTON

    • The Anatomy of Melancholy

    — THOMAS CAREW

    • Song
    • The Second Rapture
    • Disdain Returned
    • Song (Persuasions to Enjoy)

    — ELIZABETH CARY

    • The Tragedy of Mariam, The Fair Queen of Jewry

    — JOHN CLEVELAND

    • Mark Antony

    — ANTHONY ASHLEY COOPER, FIRST EARL OF SHAFTESBURY

    • A Character of Henry Hastings

    — ABIEZER COPPE

    • A Fiery Flying Roll

    — RICHARD CORBET

    • A Proper New Ballad: The Fairies’ Farewell, or God-A-Mercy Will

    — ABRAHAM COWLEY

    • The Wish
    • To Mr. Hobbes
    • To the Royal Society

    — RICHARD CRASHAW

    • Luke 7
    • On Our Crucified Lord, Naked and Bloody

    — SIR WILLIAM DAVENANT

    • A Song

    — JOHN DONNE

    • Devotions upon Emergent Occasions: Meditation XI
    • Twicknam Garden
    • To the Countess of Bedford
    • The Curse
    • Lovers’ Infiniteness
    • The Storm
    • Elegy I. Jealousy
    • Elegy IV. The Perfume
    • Paradoxes and Problems
    • Sermon LXV: On the Weight of Eternal Glory
    • Sermon LXXVI: On Falling Out of God’S Hand
    • A Nocturnal upon Saint Lucy’s Day, Being the Shortest Day
    • The Blossom
    • A Lecture upon the Shadow
    • Holy Sonnet 17 (“Since she whom I loved hath paid her last debt”)

    EDWARD, LORD HERBERT OF CHERBURY

    • Sonnet of Black Beauty

    — JOSEPH HALL

    • Sir Thomas Overbury and John Earle

    — ROBERT HAYMAN

    • Of the Great and Famous

    — GEORGE HERBERT

    • Temptation
    • Anagram
    • Hope
    • Sin’s Round
    • Love Unknown
    • Aaron
    • The Altar
    • Redemption
    • Easter Wings
    • Jordan (1)
    • The Collar
    • The Pulley
    • The Flower
    • Love (3)

    — ROBERT HERRICK

    • An Ode for Him
    • Discontents in Devon
    • Upon a Child That Died
    • Oberon’s Feast
    • The Pillar of Fame
    • His Grange, or Private Wealth
    • Upon His Spaniel Tracy
    • To Lar
    • The Lily in a Crystal
    • To Blossoms
    • To the Water Nymphs Drinking at the Fountain

    — LUCY HUTCHINSON

    • Memoirs of Colonel Hutchinson

    — EDWARD HYDE, EARL OF CLARENDON

    • The History of the Rebellion

    — BEN JONSON

        • It Was a Beauty That I Saw
        • An Elegy
        • Gypsy Songs
        • The Vision of Delight
        • An Ode
        • To William Camden
        • On Don Surly
        • In the Person of Womankind
        • Slow, Slow, Fresh Fount
        • Epitaph on Elizabeth, L. H.
        • A Celebration of Charis in Ten Lyric Pieces
        • Though I Am Young
        • Pleasure Reconciled to Virtue

    — HENRY KING

        • The Exequy

    — JOHN LILBURNE

        • The Picture of the Council of State

    — RICHARD LOVELACE

        • The Snail

    — ANDREW MARVELL

        • Mourning
        • On Paradise Lost

    — JOHN MILTON

        • At a Solemn Music
        • When the Assault Was Intended to the City
        • A Book Was Writ of Late Called Tetrachordon
        • Lawrence, of Virtuous Father Virtuous Son
        • Of Education
        • Comus
        • To My Friend, Mr. Henry Lawes, on His Airs
        • Paradise Lost: The Arguments
        • Samson Agonistes

    — DOROTHY OSBORNE

        • The Letters of Dorothy Osborne
        • [“Servants”]
        • [Fighting with Brother John]

    — CHARLES SACKVILLE, EARL OF DORSET

        • Song

    — SIR CHARLES SEDLEY

        • Song

    — JAMES SHIRLEY

        • Dirge

    JOHN SKELTON

        • Upon a Dead Man’s Head
        • To Mistress Margaret Hussey
        • Colin Clout

    — RACHEL SPEGHT

        • A Dream

    — THOMAS SPRAT

        • The History of the Royal Society

    — JAMES STEWART, KING JAMES I

        • The True Law of Free Monarchies

    SIR JOHN SUCKLING

        • A Song to a Lute

    — JEREMY TAYLOR

        • Gems of Pulpit Rhetoric

    — ANNA TRAPNEL

        • Report and Plea

    — EDMUND WALLER

        • Of the Last Verses in the Book
        • On a Girdle
        • Of English Verse

    — IZAAK WALTON

        • The Life of Dr. John Donne

    — GERRARD WINSTANLEY

        • The True Leveler’s Standard Advanced

    — HENRY VAUGHAN

        • The Book
        • Peace
        • Man
        • A Rhapsody
        • I Walked the Other Day (To Spend My Hour)

    — SIR HENRY WOTTON

        • On His Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia

    — § § § —

    04. — The Restoration and the 18th century

    — JOSEPH ADDISON and SIR RICHARD STEELE

    • Addison: [Party Patches]
    • Addison: [The Trial of the Petticoat]
    • Steele: [The Gentleman; The Pretty Fellow]
    • Steele: [Dueling]
    • Addison: [Sir Roger at Church]

    –JOHN BUNYAN

    • From Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners

    — WILLIAM COLLINS

    • Ode Written in the Beginning of the Year 1746
    • Ode on the Death of Mr. Thomson

    — WILLIAM CONGREVE

    • Love for Love

    — GEORGE CRABBE

    • from The Borough

    — A GRACE BEYOND THE REACH OF ART

    • LONGINUS: [Genius and the Rules]
    • QUINTILIAN: [When to Break the Rules]
    • RENÉ RAPIN: [Grace Beyond the Rules]
    • SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE: [The Inadequacy of the Rules]
    • JOHN HUGHES: [“Curiosa Felicitas”]
    • ROGER DE PILES: [Grace Gains the Heart]
    • LEONARD WELSTED: [No Precepts Can Teach Grace]

    — THE GENERAL AND THE PARTICULAR

    • ARISTOTLE: [Poetry and History Contrasted]
    • HORACE: [Character Types in Comedy]
    • SIR WILLIAM DAVENANT: [Poetry and History Contrasted]
    • ANTHONY ASHLEY COOPER, THIRD EARL OF SHAFTESBURY:
      [The General and the Particular in Painting]
    • SAMUEL JOHNSON: [The Particular in Biography]
    • SAMUEL JOHNSON: [The Simplicity of Grandeur]
    • SAMUEL JOHNSON: [Hudibras and the Particular]
    • SAMUEL JOHNSON: [The Grandeur of Generality]
    • JOSEPH WARTON: [On Thomson’s Seasons]
    • HUGH BLAIR: [The Particular in Descriptive Poetry]
    • SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDS: [The General and the
      Particular in Painting — The “Grand Style”]
    • WILLIAM BLAKE: [The Aesthetic Value of the General Denied]

    — GENIUS

    • Samuel Johnson: [Definitions of Genius]
    • John Dryden: [Genius Is above Correctness]
    • Joseph Addison: [The Beauties of Great
      Geniuses Independent of Rules]
    • Samuel Johnson: [Genius Requires Invention]
    • Edward Young: [Imitation and Genius]
    • Samuel Johnson: [Genius and Knowledge]
    • Alexander Gerard: [The Origins of Genius]
    • John Moir: [The Unique Vision of Original Genius]
    • Sir Joshua Reynolds: [Genius the Child of Imitation]
    • William Blake: [Genius Unbound]
    • William Hazlitt: [Reynolds’ Genius]

    — DANIEL DEFOE

    • from The History and Remarkable Life
      of the Truly Honorable Col. Jacque
    • A True Relation of the Apparition of One Mrs. Veal

    — JOHN DRYDEN

    • Epilogue to The Conquest of Granada, II
    • Prologue to The Tempest
    • Epilogue to Tyrannic Love
    • Song from The Indian Emperor
    • Song from An Evening’s Love
    • To the Pious Memory of the Accomplished Young Lady Mrs. Anne Killigrew
    • The Secular Masque
    • from The Preface to Fables Ancient and Modern
      • In Praise of Chaucer

    — ANNE FINCH, COUNTESS OF WINCHILSEA

    • On Myself

    — JOHN GAY

    • The Birth of the Squire. An Eclogue
    • Recitativo and Air from Acis and Galatea

    — OLIVER GOLDSMITH

    • from Letters from a Citizen of the World

    — THOMAS GRAY

    SAMUEL JOHNSON

    • from Prayers and Meditations
    • Rambler No. 203
    • Idler No. 58
    • Prologue Spoken by Mr. Garrick
    • Translation of Horace, Odes, Book 4.7
    • from Lives of the Poets
      • Milton
        • LYCIDAS
        • L’ALLEGRO, IL PENSEROSO
        • PARADISE LOST
      • Cowley
    • Metaphysical Wit

     

    • Pope

     

     

     

    ALEXANDER POPE

    • Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady
    • The First Satire of the Second Book
      of Horace Imitated
    • The Universal Prayer
    • Epistle to Miss Blount
    • from The Dunciad
      • The Carnation and the Butterfly
    • Ode on Solitude

    MATTHEW PRIOR

    • A True Maid
    • A Better Answer

    RICHARD BRINSLEY SHERIDAN

    • The School for Scandal

    CHRISTOPHER SMART

    • A Song to David

    SIR RICHARD STEELE

    • See Addision, Joseph

    LAURENCE STERNE

    • Reply to Sancho
    • from Tristram Shandy

    JONATHAN SWIFT

    JAMES THOMSON

    • An Ode on Aeolus’s Harp
    • from The Seasons
      • Summer
        • DAWN
        • SWIMMING
        • EVENING
      • Winter
    • A SNOWSTORM

    — § § § —

    05. — The Romantic Period

    — THE ART OF ROMANTIC POETRY

    • William Blake
    • William Wordsworth
    • Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Spontaneous and Controlled Composition
    • Lord Byron
    • Edward J. Trelawny: Shelley on Composing
    • Thomas Medwin: Shelley’s Self-Hypercriticism
    • Richard Woodhouse: Keats on Composing

    — THE SATANIC AND BYRONIC HERO

    — ANNA LETITIA BARBAULD

    • Life

    — THOMAS LOVELL BEDDOES

    — WILLIAM BLAKE

    — WILLIAM LISLE BOWLES

    — ROBERT BURNS

    SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

    GEORGE DARLEY

    THOMAS DE QUINCEY

    GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON

    WILLIAM HAZLITT

    JOHN KEATS

    • from Endymion
    • from Book IV

    LEIGH HUNT

    CHARLES LAMB

    WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR

    — THOMAS MOORE

    — THOMAS LOVE PEACOCK

    JOSEPH PRIESTLEY

    — PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY

    — ROBERT SOUTHEY

    — SIR WALTER SCOTT

    — ELHANAN WINCHESTER

    — WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

    — § § § —

    06. — The Victorian Age

    — MATTHEW ARNOLD

    — THOMAS CARLYLE

    — JOHN STUART MILL

    — JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN

    — ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

    — ROBERT BROWNING

    — LEWIS CARROLL

    — ARTHUR HUGH CLOUGH

    — CHARLES DICKENS

    — GEORGE ELIOT

    — WILLIAM ERNEST HENLEY

    — W. S. GILBERT

    — THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY

    — INDUSTRIALISM: PROGRESS OR DECLINE?

    — GEORGE MEREDITH

    — WILLIAM MORRIS

    — WALTER PATER

    — COVENTRY PATMORE

    — DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI

    — CHRISTINA ROSSETTI

    — JOHN RUSKIN

    — ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE

    — ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

    — FRANCIS THOMPSON

    — OSCAR WILDE

    — § § § —

    07. — The 20th century and After

    — ANONYMOUS

    — RUPERT BROOKE

    — JOSEPH CONRAD

    — ERNEST DOWSON

    — GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS

    — LIONEL JOHNSON

    — RUDYARD KIPLING

    — JAMES MORRIS

    — RICHARD MULCAHY

    — JAWAHARLAL NEHRU

    — EDWARD THOMAS

    27636_20th_U09_Thomas-1-3


    ENGLISH LIT.
    The English language
    “Elizabethan era” / “Love letters”
    Anthology / Chronology / Terminology
    Glossary of works, writers & literary devices:
    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
    • • • • • •
    📕 Reading lists 📗 Poets of note 📘 Writers of note
    • • • • • •
    How to analyse poetry & prose
    French in English / Latin in English
    Phrases & idioms (with their etymology)


    End Notes

    * n.b. This page relies heavily on the scholarly work of:
    Greenblatt, S &, Abrams, M. H. (Eds.). 2006. The Norton Anthology of English Literature (8th ed.). New York: W. W. Norton & Company.