📙 Love in the Time of Cholera

(Gabriel García Márquez | 1928–2014)

The power of love is limitless.
A poignant meditation on the nature of desire, and the enduring power of love

It is enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment.

In Love in the Time of Cholera, the protagonist, Florentino Ariza, is a hopeless romantic who falls passionately for the beautiful Fermina Daza, but finds his love tragically rejected.

Instead Fermina marries a distinguished doctor Juvenal Urbino, while Florentino can only wait silently for her. He can never forget his first and only true love. Then, fifty-one years, nine months and four days later, Fermina’s husband dies unexpectedly.

At last Florentino has another chance to declare his feelings and discover if a passion that has endured for half a century will remain unrequited, in a rich, fantastical and humane celebration of love in all its many forms.

“The nearest thing to sensual pleasure prose can offer”
Daily Telegraph

“A celebration of the many kinds of love between men and women”
The Times

Gabriel García Márquez was born in Colombia. He is the author of many novels, including One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) and The General in His Labyrinth (1989). He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982.

Think of love as a state of grace; not the means to anything but the alpha and omega, an end in itself.

There is always something left to love.

They were so close to each other that they preferred death to separation.

Author: Anna Bidoonism

You'll find lots of (1) poems & (2) prose on my blog as well as information about (3) literary analysis (4) philosophy & (5) psychology. This is me; this is who I am.

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